Critical thinking exercise understanding correlations answers

The Case for 'Argument' in Education Argument is a more complex and challenging cognitive skill for students than other genres of reading and writing, such as exposition or narration.

Critical thinking exercise understanding correlations answers

Summary In this anthropology assignment, students are introduced to a method of integrating quantitative and qualitative data analysis in cross-cultural studies.

Fundamentals: More About Necessary and Sufficient Conditions (video) | Khan Academy

Students make cross-tabulations using the Ethnographic Atlas, an online database coded for societies, and discuss the results of the observed correlations.

The whole class first runs a cross-tabulation comparing Subsistence Economy with Descent and is asked to explain the difference between actual versus expected distribution values as well as probability and chi square. Learning Goals Learning goals: Familiarize students with the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data in ethnological research with special reference to the Ethnographic Atlas.

Further students' active learning in understanding that culture is not composed of disarticulated shreds and patches but instead exhibits a functional interdependence of institutions, traits, and variables.

Give students an opportunity to experiment in seeing which cultural variables exhibit statistically significant correlations and require them to explain those associations using hypotheses integrating both qualitative and quantitative data.

Show students the relation between ethnological knowledge, cross-cultural patterns, numerical literacy, critical thinking, and the scientific method.

Context for Use This exercise can be used for any college level courses in anthropology and cross-cultural studies. It works particularly well in methods courses where the class has access to a computer lab so that all can engage in the activity together and discuss the results.

The exercise ideally can be completed in a single session. Description and Teaching Materials The text below is given to students an an assignment handout.

Introduction to the Ethnographic Atlas: Integrating quantitative and qualitative data analysis in cross-cultural studies There are two main branches of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnography and ethnology.

Ethnography is the detailed description of a culture based on first hand observations. Ethnology is the cross-cultural or comparative study of different cultures, based on data obtained from various ethnographies.

Two powerful tools used in certain types of ethnological and cross-cultural research is the electronic Human Relations Area Files and the online Ethnographic Atlas.

In this assignment, students are introduced to a method of integrating quantitative and qualitative data analysis in cross-cultural studies using the Ethnographic Atlas.

Critical thinking exercise understanding correlations answers

Students consider why certain types of descent systems are correlated with specific subsistence economies. Students then experiment with running several cross-tabulations of their own design.

Go to the Ethnographic Atlas http: Tick the box marked "Expected. Why might you want to compare actual versus expected distribution values? What do the probability and chi square values show? Make the following cross tabulation: Subsistence Economy and Descent What is the result that you get?

Make hypotheses that explain the distribution of values seen in the cells. What hypotheses might explain the positive correlations reflected in the data, which cultural variables or traits intersect and why? Which traits are negatively correlated? What hypotheses might account for these negative associations?

Using ethnographic data culled from the literature you have read for this course, as well as the "Cultural Summaries" listed in the Ethnographic Atlas http: Is there evidence that weakens your hypotheses?

What alternate hypotheses might also account for the data displayed in the cross-tabulation of descent and subsistence economy?Students have numerous opportunities throughout the text to refine their critical thinking abilities as they answer thought-provoking questions, complete problem-solving activities within the module, and review end of module activities and assignments.

The Course Outcomes Scale of SIR II One of the additions to the Student Instructional Report in was the scale of Course Outcomes.

This scale includes five items that assesses more comprehensively student perceptions of their learning in a course, and. So critical thinking is making sure we have good reasons for our beliefs, and so one of the essential[br]skills that you learn when you're studying[br]critical thinking is how to distinguish good reasons[br]for believing something from bad reasons for believing something.

Group activities thus offer a framework for reflection, and encourage participants to begin thinking critically about their experiences. Through exposure to a variety of viewpoints, participants develop their understanding of the issues and improve their ability to reflect without relying on structured exercises.

Research Is Limited on the Writing-Thinking Link

Show students the relation between ethnological knowledge, cross-cultural patterns, numerical literacy, critical thinking, and the scientific method.

Context for Use This exercise can be used for any college level courses in anthropology and cross-cultural studies. The goal of this workshop was to teach students self-regulating techniques with visualization-based exercises as a foundation for learning and critical thinking in two areas: information processing and self-testing.

Diversity: Making Sense of It Through Critical Thi