Hybridity was the sign of productivity of colonial power

Questions of ambivalence and authority under a tree outside Delhi, May ," in The Location of Culturepp.

Hybridity was the sign of productivity of colonial power

As De Quincey increases his opium use, he loses himself in a new hybrid identity. De Quincey demonstrates anxiety about his opium usage from the beginning of the essay. He feels the need to assert multiple times that he does not feel guilty about his opium habit.

He also highlights the quality of his own character, while outlining what he sees as widespread opium use among the English upper class. It is as though he is trying to write opium out of its well-known oriental context and into the quotidian of the English intellectual and aristocratic classes.

Colonial discourse strives to place the colonizing power and the colonized into a fixed binary, in which they are opposites. Yet, these characteristics must be constantly repeated because they cannot be proven to be true. For her, the problem arises when the colonial power believes that the stereotype is true because it assumes it can have complete knowledge of the colonised.

Ania Loomba describes what can be expected from colonial stereotypes. The pure and beautiful familiar is contrasted with the dark and evil other, exemplifying the constructed binary described by Bhabha.

Loomba also notes that stereotypes held by Europeans about non-Europeans tend to be similar across different cultures. When we consider that stereotypes are similar for different cultures, the constructedness of the stereotypes employed by De Quincey is emphasized. He tries to separate Oriental opium use from his own kind of use.

Despite his efforts, the infiltration of the Orient into his life through opium is inescapable. He later describes how his opium use is intellectual: His repetition of the difference between English and Turkish opium use is an example of the forced reiteration of an unprovable stereotype.

Hybridity was the sign of productivity of colonial power

It is not enough, however, to highlight the use of stereotype and expose its limitations. In other words, it is not enough to recognise the use of stereotype and to condemn it; one must consider its effect and utility in colonial discourse.

While unfavourable stereotypes justify the assertion of European dominance over colonised groups, they also work as a mechanism for defining the colonising power as the opposite of the colonial other The colonising society decides what it wants to be, and arbitrarily paints the colonised society as its opposite.

Lack of comprehension of the colonial other allows the colonizer to cast it in whatever role it sees as opposite to itself. That is, neither party emerges from the colonial encounter unchanged. So as much as De Quincey may try to maintain his constructed binary, it will never accurately describe either his culture or the Orient.

Neither the defined role of the self nor that of the other is as fixed as colonial discourse would like to make us believe: While he does demonstrate an appreciation for the Oriental in this case, he simultaneously engages in stereotyping.

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It seems that for De Quincey, while the traditions of these cultures are rich, they are also primitive, their people stuck in the days of the Old Testament. In these dreams De Quincey is changed by the East. The stereotype no longer works as a mechanism for him to distance himself from the East and assert his dominance over it.

We also see in these dreams an example of the return of the look. As I have described, De Quincey is at first terrified by his dreams. As he sees the East more and more as a part of himself, he starts to hate what he sees and, consequently, he hates what the opium is doing to him.

What he begins to hate is the presence of the East within himself. Hybridity is also present in the recurring image of the crocodile, which is anthropomorphised. Other animals are presented as objects of horror. De Quincey cannot escape the colonial encounter unchanged. When De Quincey becomes the coloniser, London becomes the Orient.

Hybridity was the sign of productivity of colonial power

The many human faces he sees on these journeys return in later years to haunt him. It is not only De Quincey who is losing his identity because of the colonial encounter, London also espouses a hybrid identity. Thus the Orient seems to present a threat to De Quincey personally, as well as British society as a whole.

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It is opium that transports him to the Orient in his dreams, it is opium that creates the recurring crocodile, and it is opium that makes London feel like a terra incognita.

De Quincey similarly relies on imperialism to fuel his debilitating opium addiction. When the crocodile returns in his dreams, it is perhaps a reminder of, or symbolic of, this addiction which refuses to leave him alone.

The crocodile follows him in his dreams as his obsession for opium follows him in his life. These efforts, however, must be unsuccessful because the colonial encounter affects both the colonizer and the colonized from the start, as Homi Bhabha details in his theory of hybridity.Hybridity is the sign of the productivity of colonial power, its shifting forces and fixities; it is the name for the strategic reversal of the process of domination through disavowal (that is, the production of discriminatory identities that secure the 'pure' and original identity of authority).

Hybridity is the sign of the productivity of colonial power, its shifting forces and fixities; it is the name for the strategic reversal of the process of Naipaul.

For Bhabha, “hybridity is the sign of the productivity of colonial power, its shifting forces and leslutinsduphoenix.com strategic reversal of the process of domination through disavowal”.

27 He reiterates the point by stating that “colonial hybridity is not a problem of genealogy or identity between two different cultures [it] is that the.

Hybridity, Bhabha argues, subverts the narratives of colonial power and dominant cultures. The series of inclusions and exclusions on which a dominant culture is premised are deconstructed by the very entry of the formerly-excluded subjects into the mainstream discourse (See Representation, Nationalism).

The way power and domination are theorized has been irrevocably altered by Post-Structuralist and Post-Marxist insights. No longer is repression viewed purely in negative and material terms, but a far more complex array of ideological relationships are introduced.

Hybridity is the sign of the productivity of colonial power - Assignment Example On In Assignment Sample The way power and domination are theorized has been irrevocably altered by Post-Structuralist and Post-Marxist insights.

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